Dr Jessica Ferm​

Lecturer

Dr Jessica Ferm is a Lecturer at the Bartlett School of Planning, University College London.  She is a practice-focused academic with research interests in spatial planning, economic development and social justice and has published widely on these topics in Urban Studies, European Planning Studies, Planning Practice and Research, Journal of Corporate Real Estate.  She is co-editor of a book on Planning Practice in the UK, (Routledge, 2018) and co-author of Understanding the Impacts of Deregulation in Planning: Turning offices into homes (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019).  She has worked on research projects for the RICS Research Trust and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.  Jessica is active in planning practice and policy in London, she is a member of Just Space Economy and Planning, the London Planning and Development Forum, the Economics Roundtable for London and the GLA Industrial and Logistics Sounding Board.  Prior to becoming a lecturer, Jessica worked for ten years as a planning consultant and in public practice for a North London planning authority.

Recent London posts

Planning for residential ‘value’ in London?

Planning for residential ‘value’ in London?

Image by David SamuelIn a seminar for the Department of Land Economy at the University of Cambridge, London WHIG team member Nicola Livingstone reflected on findings from a recently published paper that explores planning for ‘value’ through densification. ​The paper...

The Geographies of Viability Planning

The Geographies of Viability Planning

In a recent new publication Whig researchers Jess Ferm and Mike Raco explore the geographies of viability-driven planning reform in England.Drawing on interviews and fieldwork in London and the North East region, the paper reflects on the variable outcomes and...

Towards an understanding of the role of debt

Towards an understanding of the role of debt

Given our focus on investment into residential real estate, an essential dimension is understanding how housing fits more broadly within the financialized economy of the UK (and the Netherlands and France).  An important but under engaged within urban studies part of...